Interfacing With Another Species 7.2 Ksecs Too Early

Ξ September 29th, 2008 | → 0 Comments | ∇ special, Work, code, japan, coding, programming, conference, meeting |

I’ve been scheduled for a conference call without my input on the time for more than 7Ksecs before I usually resume consciousness.  In the past this has usually resulted in disaster for the other involved parties, as I typically can’t resume from standby that early, let alone speak in coherent sentences or form what humans would consider lucid thoughts.  My ideal employer would either be able to work with this better, or be located in Japan.

This article on Code Climber identifies a lot of the most important reasons I and so many others work best at night. There are numerous benefits to working at night:

  • There are far less interruptions by email, instant message, and news via RSS
  • There is minimal interaction with human species, as they seem to prefer sleeping while Sol illuminates the oppopsite side of their planet
  • My best and most productive work requires long periods of concentration and Focus

Original post by Maker

 

From the land of the rising sun, Post 4.

Ξ March 23rd, 2008 | → 0 Comments | ∇ travel, blog, ninja, japan |

3/23/08
Japan, Day 3

I went to sleep at 8:30 last night, I was so tired. Slept fine until 4am, then woke up every half hour until 7am. I didn’t have time to eat anything this morning, so I just grabbed some juice on the way to the hombu.

The first class today was with Nagato-sensei .  He emphasized using the body, instead of your strength when doing techniques, something I need to pay more attention to.  If a technique isn’t working for me, I have a tendency to just try to muscle through it. It’s much easier if I start out using my body to do the technique. Trying to muscle it is usually what messes it up in the first place.  There wasn’t a lot of room in the hombu today, because Soke’s class was right after. It ended up being a good thing, because the lack of room reinforced how little space you really need, if you use your taijutsu. Usually, when we train we’re making these huge movements, deep kamaes, gigantic parries, etc. Ron says it all the time; a punch can miss you by a foot or by a quarter of an inch, it’s still a miss. Training with all those people around really reinforces it.

Soke’s class was 15 minutes after Nagato-sensei’s, and even more people were there for that .I know I’ve said it before, but Soke’s movements are amazing. They’re so subtle, so its very hard to catch everything he’s doing. I really appreciate Ron training with Ashley and I today. He’s a very patient teacher with the both of us, and I know he’d love to be training at a higher level. It means a lot to me that he’s taking the time with us to say things like “no, put your hand here,” and not just throwing his hands up in disgust with us. Both Soke and Nagato-sensei seemed to reinforce being very light with your movements today. I saw two advantages to this: 1) it’s very easy. You don’t get tired when you’re doing it this way. 2) It’s a lot harder to read someone when they’re just laying two fingers on the inside of your wrist, rather than grabbing you with all their strength. We did some seated things today, from fudoza. One was from a grab from behind, a punch to the head from the side, and a punch to the head from another seated person.

When Soke’s class was over, we went to Naguchi-sensei’s class where I watched people film some of the stuff they learned to day in class. I made a fool of myself when Naguchi-sensei leaned out his window and said “Konichiwa!” to me, because I had no idea who he was. I had no idea his dojo was right next door to his house. I was offered the chance to get on film as well, but I was a little too unsure of myself to do that. Turns out I could’ve just let Ron beat up on me, and been fine.

Finally, Lunch time! Surprisingly, I wasn’t all that hungry. I’ve discovered a wonderful citrusy juice/soda drink, but I can’t remember the name of it. We had Chinese food. Kind of bland. Meh.

We went to a park in Shimizu-koen after lunch. It’s the site of that obstacle course thing in the ninjutsu episode of Human Weapon. It’s not a “secret ninja training compound” like they said it was. It’s in the middle of a huge public park, owned by one of the Kikkoman families. There were a bunch of youngsters running a race there! We didn’t get a chance to run through it, but Robin mentioned it might not be a great idea anyway, since the water’s likely freezing cold this time of year. Maybe if we come back during summertime. Before we got to the obstacle course, we happened on a very nice old Japanese man, watching 3 little girls playing in the water, trying to catch some carp in a little stream/pond they have there.  Everyone here always surprises me with how well they speak English. Baka gaijin! I feel like such a jerk whenever I can’t say something in Japanese.  We walked around the park for a long time, until it was konbanwa time.  It’s such a beautiful place, I took lots of pictures. Even some with me in them! Way to ruin the beauty, eh?

Original post by logikal

 

From the land of the rising sun, Post 2.

Ξ March 23rd, 2008 | → 0 Comments | ∇ travel, blog, ninja, japan |

3/21/2008
Konbanwa!

So, day 2 in Japan started early, with a traditional japanese breakfast of cooked whole fish (it still had eyes!), raw egg, rice, pickled veggies, miso soup, seaweed, and some dark squiggly stuff. I tried everything, except the fish. I couldn’t quite pull it off. Raw egg on rice was alright, but probably not something I’ll ever order again.

We headed to the store, where Ron grabbed this shopping cart. A little different, eh? Then we split up for the day.

Getting cash out of an ATM machine in Japan can only be done in one place, the post office. Had I known this, I wouldnt have gone on a 2 hour trek, that had 2 very wonderful Japanese people walking Ashley and I around town. Now I know though.

Oh, my Engrish phrase for the day: “Luck is Smilling” Seen on a T-shirt in a department store today.

Noodle Bowls here are amazing.

We visited a local graveyard in Noda, then went to Atago Shrine yesterday before class. We had dinner at a place called Seiziriya (I think) surprisingly good pizza (there’s not a lot of japanese food there, but you get a really good value). We headed to the Hombu, and trained with Soke.

Soke has a presence about him that I’m not able to explain. I could tell when he had walked into the dojo, even though there were 120 people in the way. Crazy. Training with him is hard, he goes so fast.

We came back to Kashiwa after class, and tried to figure out how Ashley was going to get to Nagoya on Saturday. We looked around on the internet for a bit then just decided to go to the station and try to get her a ticket. We ran into a musician named Kazuya, and listened to him for a while. He got told to leave by the authorities, and then helped us with trying to get Ashley’s ticket (which we couldn’t, it was too late). He spoke pretty good English, just limited vocabulary. Ashley got his number. We might hang out with him Saturday.

Then I came home at about midnight and got some much deserved sleep.

Original post by logikal

 

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